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Navigating Institutional Politics Quick Guide

A how-to on navigating institutional politics isn’t typically included in the onboarding process for a new job, but it is a skill that can make or break your time at an institution. Particularly as you work to grow a collegiate recovery program, you will need the ability to navigate these sometimes-complicated waters in order to convince the right people to provide the support you will need to achieve institutionalization and sustainability. Although this guide is far from all-encompassing, it is the hope of TYR that through this toolkit, we can provide you with some food for thought, some questions to ponder, and a few tips and tricks to start leveraging your assets to produce change on your campus.

Don’t have time to read the full toolkit? Check out our quick guide instead!

Recovery Support In and Around Community College Campuses in the U.S.

This study examines the landscape of recovery support in and around community colleges in the United States, and the role that community colleges play in the continuum of recovery support for young people in recovery.

Marketing and Outreach Toolkit

Attracting students in recovery is an on-going process, and is critical to the success of any collegiate recovery community. This toolkit is designed for collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) and their members who want to attract students in recovery, get the word out about their CRP, and/or connect with assets on their campus and in their community. This toolkit will assist in generating ideas on how to accomplish these goals through avenues such as social media, campus advertisements, presentations and outreach.

Activity and Program Toolkit

An important factor for recovery protection for any student is being able to have fun without using substances. Providing effective activities and programming for your CRP students (or allowing them to plan their own) is an important piece of that puzzle. In addition to being fun, activities and programs allow students to get to know each other better, attract new students to the group, and build community amongst members. Whether you are just starting out and need a few easy programs or activities to complete, or you are an established program looking to switch things up, we hope you will find this toolkit to be helpful in providing meaningful, fun and effective activities and programs for your students.

Navigating Institutional Politics Toolkit

A how-to on navigating institutional politics isn’t typically included in the onboarding process for a new job, but it is a skill that can make or break your time at an institution. Particularly as you work to grow a collegiate recovery program, you will need the ability to navigate these sometimes-complicated waters in order to convince the right people to provide the support you will need to achieve institutionalization and sustainability. Although this guide is far from all-encompassing, it is the hope of TYR that through this toolkit, we can provide you with some food for thought, some questions to ponder, and a few tips and tricks to start leveraging your assets to produce change on your campus.

Collegiate Recovery Program Building Blocks Toolkit

When starting a collegiate recovery program (CRP), it may feel as though there are an endless amount of factors to consider. Where should one begin? In this publication, Transforming Youth Recovery outlines the components needed to lay a solid foundation for any CRP.

Collegiate Recovery Program Fundraising Toolkit

The beauty of starting a Collegiate Recovery Program (CRP) is that it influences a vision for the future of your campus. As you begin to build a community of student support on campus and see the powerful impact it is having on student well-being and success, the desire to ensure that this effort remains a lasting part of the university will inevitably set in. During this time focus may shift from the initial concerns of gathering a group of students to ensuring the current program exists as a longstanding student service. As your CRP cycles out of its early notion and establishment stages and into maturity and sustainability one of the issues that is likely to come up is that of finances. Concern may start to arise over how to successfully execute events for a growing number of students, how to better support staff, or more generally how to keep programming and services afloat in an academic environment wrought with strict budgets. The purpose of this publication is to provide the basic tools and knowledge necessary to transform your early stage collegiate recovery efforts into a program with the financial resources needed to stand the test of time. 

Collegiate Recovery Program Staff Job Description Toolkit

A goal of most, if not every emerging collegiate recovery program (CRP) is to have a staff position dedicated to its growth. Although most collegiate recovery efforts do not yet have full-time dedicated staff, we anticipate a growing number of collegiate recovery program coordinator positions springing up as more universities recognize the need on their campuses. In this publication we feature job postings for collegiate recovery program coordinators from three different universities.  

Collegiate Recovery Program Student Internship Objectives Toolkit

This internship program is intended for students in recovery or allies of students in recovery. Through this year long internship program the student will be exposed to collegiate recovery efforts and supports both on campus as well as in their local community. The student intern will be expected to take an active role in the growth of the Collegiate Recovery Program (CRP) on their campus and the expanding national collegiate recovery field. It is important that each university tailor the internship to their distinct needs and objectives as well. The overarching goal for this internship is to build capacity, work towards financial stability, and program sustainability for the CRP.

Closing The Gap: An examination of access to Best-In-Class evidence-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs for K-12 students.

Closing The Gap presents the landscape of K-12 prevention programs in the U.S. as captured by a number of online databases and offers a cross-referencing of registries and evaluator sites in order to identify 17 Best-In-Class evidence-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs. Additionally, a rich history of school-based health and prevention is provided.

Closing The Gap: Table C

184 Potential Evidence-Based Prevention Programs from Registries. Table C from Closing The Gap: An examination of access to Best-In-Class evidence-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs for K-12 students in the U.S. 

Closing The Gap: Table D Program Rubric

17 Best-In-Class evidence-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs for K-12 students in the U.S. Table D from Closing The Gap: An examination of access to Best-In-Class evidence-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs for K-12 students in the U.S. 

2015 Collegiate Recovery Asset Survey Report (Published August, 2015)

The annual Collegiate Recovery Asset Survey, supported by Transforming Youth Recovery, aims to update studies under­taken to identify community assets that can help students in recovery to thrive in the fullness of the college experience. Starting in 2014, the survey was lengthened to ask TYR Grantees about the nature of their collegiate recovery program/effort (CRP/E), the relationship between their CRP/E and local community-based assets, and the practices that are a result of their CRP/E. In 2015, the survey was extended further to ask a series of open-ended questions meant to inform a discussion on indicators that may be predictive of institutional endorsement or acceptance of a CRP/E. The intention is to deepen the understanding of the practices that might contribute to the long-term sustainability of CRP/Es within campus communities. A total of 91 CRP/Es participated in this year’s survey. 

38 Assets for Building Collegiate Recovery Capacity (Rev. August, 2015)

TYR has identified a set of 38 community-based assets that are the basis for building collegiate recovery capacity across the nation. These assets reflect the potential college-specific individuals, associations and institutions that can be assembled into practices to help students in recovery to thrive in the fullness of the college experience. To assist communities undertaking collegiate recovery efforts, the assets have been categorized to support the progression of a recovery community lifecycle. These categories reflect findings from a 2015 Collegiate Recovery Asset Survey completed by 91 collegiate recovery programs and efforts in the United States. 

The Assets for Building Collegiate Recovery Capacity

This research funded by The Stacie Mathewson Foundation leverages asset models to describe community-based assets. To date, asset models have had limited application within the field of collegiate recovery. The application of asset models in this context can aid and inform researchers and practitioners interested in the advancement and proliferation of collegiate recovery programs.Importantly this work is not intended to evaluate the effectiveness of any given college-based recovery program. Rather, the intent is to identify the assets that a community can apply to establish, support, grow and sustain collegiate recovery efforts.

Capacity Building for Collegiate Recovery

This publication could be read as a report from a research team that has spent six months interviewing and surveying individuals with primary experience in collegiate recovery. But don’t be fooled! It is actually a field manual for asset-based community developers. If you are thinking about, engaged in, or stuck in the early stages of a collegiate recovery effort, this is your step-by-step guide for effective action.

Worksheet #1: Creating a Statement of Intentions

The power of stating and intention is to paint a picture of moving from a current state to a desired state. With this, you signal the better nature of life being sought as you continue on the path to recovery. And, with this, you can spend your days inspiring others live up to what you have stated.

Worksheet #2: Community Asset Form

Use this form while community mapping to gather and record information for entry into the Collegiate Recovery Asset Map:  collegiaterecovery.capacitype.com 

Worksheet #3: Mobilizing Recovery Practices and Local Coalitions Worksheet

The progressive steps toward mobilizing assets into recovery practices begin with conversations, but it doesn’t end until practices are supported through coalitions of cooperation that deepen community awareness and work toward the institutionalization of your collegiate recovery efforts.

Market Study for Recovery High Schools

The 2013 Market Study for Recovery High Schools supported by The Stacie Mathewson Foundation presents the landscape of recovery schools (recovery high schools) in the U.S. and offers an analysis of the conditions that will promote or hinder the future expansion of this type of school-based recovery support.

School-Based Recovery Support: Characteristics

This analysis is intended to assist families, professionals, researchers and policymakers with understanding the differences between school choices for students in recovery from a substance use or co-occurring disorder.

School-Based Recovery Support: A Framework

This analysis is intended to assist families, professionals, researchers and policymakers with understanding the differences between school choices for students in recovery from substance use or co-occurring disorders. The framework is organized with the schools closest in type to recovery high schools through those having the least in common with a recovery high school.

State-by-State Favorability Map

When favorability indicators that were identified during the 2013 Market Study were applied to each state, the study found that 14.63% (6 out of 41) of states had low favorability for starting or sustaining recovery schools, 78.05% (32 out of 41) had neutral favorability for starting or sustaining recovery schools and 7.32% (3 out of 41) had high favorability for starting or sustaining recovery schools.

Recovery School Favorability Scorecard

The Favorability Scorecard provides a listing of applied scoring by favorability indicator. For each indicator, a state could receive the score of H for high favorability, N for neutral or L for low favorability. Where data could not be located or an indicator did not apply to a particular state the designation, ND (No Data) was used. Where data could not be collected from a particular state due to no response, the indicators was left blank.